Resolved through Conciliation

The following are complaints that were resolved through a process of conciliation between the Office of the Press Ombudsman and the publication about which the complaint was made.  The detail of some complaints, including the name of the complainant, has been restricted in cases where complainants have exercised their right to anonymity under data protection legislation.

The Irish Prison Service complained about an article published by the Sunday World which reported in detail on a complaint made by a prisoner against a member of the prison staff.  The matter was resolved when representatives of the prison service met with the newspaper’s senior editorial staff and agreement was reached that the newspaper would put in place new procedures to ensure that in future contact would be made with the prison authorities prior to the publication of any article about the prison service.

Mrs Geraldine Gallagher complained about an article published online by The Herald which referred to her late son as a “drug dealer”.    The woman said her son had no convictions for drug dealing.   The complaint was resolved when The Herald published a correction stating that the woman’s son had no criminal conviction for drug offences, and apologised for the distress caused by the article.

Mrs Geraldine Gallagher complained about an article published online by the Sunday World which referred to her late son as a “drug dealer”.     The woman said her son had no convictions for drug dealing.    The complaint was resolved when the Sunday World published an online correction stating that the woman’s son had no criminal conviction for drug offences,  and apologised for the distress caused by the article.

A woman complained about an article published by the Irish Independent which reported on a civil action which she had taken on behalf of her young child.  The complaint was resolved when the newspaper explained that it had reported on a case that was conducted in open court and upon which no reporting restrictions had been imposed.   As a gesture of goodwill it deleted the child's name and address from the online article.
A woman complained about an article published in the Herald which reported on a civil action which she had taken on behalf of her young child.  The complaint was resolved when the newspaper deleted the online article.

A woman complained about an article published in The Irish Times on a civil action which she had taken on behalf of her young child. The complaint was resolved when the editor deleted the online version of the article.  The editor explained to the woman that although the case had been heard in open court and the newspaper was free to report on the proceedings, had the woman’s legal team made a request that the case should not be reported the newspaper would have agreed to the request in the particular circumstances. 

A woman complained about an article published in TheJournal.ie which reported on a civil action which she had taken on behalf of her young child.  The complaint was resolved when the editor explained that the publication had reported only on the facts of the case as presented in court.  In order to resolve the matter, she undertook to delete the exact details of the child's address from the online article.

Mr Adams complained about an article published in the Irish Independent that stated that he had joked about the editor of the Irish Independent being held at gunpoint. The complaint was resolved when the Irish Independent published, in print and online, the following clarification and apology:

Clarification: Gerry Adams TD

In an article published on 6th November 1015 it was stated that Gerry Adams, during a speech given at a fundraiser in New York, “…. joked about the editor of the Irish Independent being held at gunpoint.”  We wish to clarify that Mr Adams’ did not joke about holding the editor of the Irish Independent at gunpoint.  He was in fact referring to an historical event which occurred almost a century ago during the War of Independence.  We apologise to Mr Adams and we are happy to clarify this.”

A man complained that Independent.ie published a photograph which belonged to him without his permission and without accreditation.  The complaint was resolved when the newspaper contacted the complainant directly and offered him an appropriate fee for the use of the photograph.

Mr Dermot Desmond complained about an article published by The Irish Times in print and online headlined “Desmond set for legal battle over Caribbean resort”, the contents of which he said were inaccurate.  The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a correction in its print edition, and re-wrote the online article to inform readers that there was no court case schedule between IIU and Canouan Resorts Development.

Carole O’Reilly complained about an article in the Irish Examiner which reported on an interview which she gave to the newspaper following her humanist wedding.  She said that the article distorted comments made by her and her husband, and did not properly or accurately reflect their views and experiences on a number of matters.  The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a statement clarifying a number of issues reported in the article.  It also apologised to Ms O’Reilly and her husband for any upset that the article may have caused them or their families.

Deputy Paul Murphy complained about the headline to a front page article in the Irish Examiner which read “TD defends Higgins Abusers”.  The article reported on the verbal abuse of President Michael D Higgins.  Deputy Murphy complained that the headline was inaccurate and misleading  because he had not defended the verbal abuse of the President, but the right of people  to protest.  The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a clarification of the matter.

Deputy Gerry Adams’ solicitors complained about the publication of a previous decision of the Press Ombudsman/Press Council in the Irish Independent, which was published further back in the newspaper than the original article which was the subject matter of the complaint.   The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a statement apologising for the error. 

NAMA complained about a headline to an article published in the Irish Daily Mirror which read “KILLED BY NAMA Farmer who took his own life was ‘driven to the end of his tether’ by bad bank”,  following the death by suicide of a man who had had dealings with NAMA.  The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a clarification stating that the headline was a comment by the newspaper of the pressure felt by the deceased, and not a statement of fact.

Louise Gilroy complained about an article published in The Irish Times which reported on the contents of a letter of resignation which she had written, which she said was not intended for circulation beyond a small group of people.  The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a statement, both in its print edition and online, that Ms Gilroy had not been responsible for passing her letter of resignation on to the newspaper, and that she did not communicate with the newspaper about the matter.

The Journal Media Ltd. complained about an article in The Irish Times, that stated that a New York venture capital fund which had negotiated Luxembourg tax agreements had a 25 per cent shareholding  in its news website TheJournal.ie, which they said was not true.  The Irish Times accepted that the statement was an error and agreed to republish, on the homepage of its website, a correction that had already been published in the print edition.

Mr Michael Grange complained about a report in the Irish Independent of a High Court case he took against the Commission for Public Service Appointments, which he said was inaccurate.   The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a clarification and deleted the article from its website.

Motorsport Ireland complained about an article in the Irish  Daily Mail which reported on an accident at the Jim  Clark Rally in Scotland in which three spectators died.    Motorsport Ireland complained that the headline to the article suggested that the driver of the rally car was to blame for what happened.  The complaint was resolved when the paper published a clarification and apologised if anyone was hurt or offended by the wording of the heading.

A descendant of one of the leaders of the l916 Rising complained about a headline to two articles published by the Irish Independent that statements she made to a journalist were reported as though she were speaking on behalf of the descendants of the Rising, when she was speaking in a personal capacity and not on behalf of anyone else.  The complaint was resolved when the newspaper deleted the articles from its website.

A man complained about an article in The Argus which reported that a Minister of State had lost her job over her stance on ‘the recent abortion referendum’, when there was no such referendum.  The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a clarification stating that the reference should have been to the ’Protection of Life during Pregnancy Act.A woman complained about an article that reported on the arrest of a man in connection with the overnight disappearance of her daughter.   The complaint was resolved when the editor wrote a letter to the mother apologising for the distress caused by the article, and undertook not to publish any further articles about the matter.

The Ambassador of Israel complained about an article in The Irish Times regarding the newspaper’s coverage of Israel, which he said was inaccurate.  The complaint was resolved when the editor offered to publish a letter from the Ambassador, and invited him to call into The Irish Times to discuss all matters of concern to him

A man complained about an article about fracking in the Irish Independent, which he said contained inaccurate references to a number of international research reports.  The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a clarification.

Mr Barry Hazel complained about an article published in the Irish Independent about the reaction of parents to a threatened teachers’ pay dispute.  The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published an article from the complainant.

The parents of a teenager complained about an article in the Sunday World about the Kilkenny minor camogie team and drinking, which included a photograph with the caption “celebrations on the team bus in pics taken from Facebook”.    The photograph included a picture of their daughter who, they said, although her face was pixelated, was identifiable from the clothes she was wearing.  They also complained that the photograph was not taken on the team bus, as reported, but in the back of a taxi.   The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a clarification stating that the picture was not taken on the team bus but in the back of an 8-seater taxi, and that neither the photograph nor the article were meant to infer that the girls in question were drinking alcohol. 

Mrs Catherine Griffin complained about an article in The Corkman that reported on the death of her son which contained a headline stating “Brian Griffin died after row”.  The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a clarification stating that Mr Griffin had not died as a result of the row, and apologised to the family for any distress caused.

 Mrs Doreen Healy complained about an article   the Irish Examiner following the inquest into the death of her daughter following her fall from a playground ride outside the 02 in Dublin, which reported on the findings of the toxicology report following her death.  The complaint was resolved when the newspaper deleted its online edition of the article. 

Mrs Doreen Healy complained about articles published in the Irish Sun, the Irish Independent and the Herald, following the inquest into the death of her daughter after her fall from a playground ride outside the 02 in Dublin, which reported on the findings of the toxicology report following her death.  The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a clarification stating that it had been pointed out that the conclusions reported were not contained in the toxicology report, and that the inquest found that Ms Healy died of misadventure  following her fall.  It also apologised to the family for the distress caused by the report.

Mr David Elio Malocco complained about an article in the Irish Independent that included a statement that he did not respond to attempts by the newspaper to contact him, which he said was untrue.  The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a clarification stating that Mr Malocco did respond but due to a production error his response was not printed.  It also apologised to Mr Malocco for the error.

A man complained that a photograph of his father, who died in 2010, was published in The Irish Times in 2013.    The complaint was speedily resolved when the newspaper traced the origins of the photograph and confirmed to the complainant that the photograph was not one of his late father, as it had been taken in a hospital in the United States in 2007. 

Mrs Doreen Healy complained about an article published in the Irish Independent following the inquest into the death of her daughter following her fall from a playground ride outside the 02 in Dublin, which reported on the findings of the toxicology report following her death.  The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a clarification stating that it had been pointed out that the conclusions reported were not contained in the toxicology report, and that the inquest found that Ms Healy died of misadventure, following her fall.  It also apologised to the family for the distress caused by the report.

A man complained about an inaccuracy contained in a book review in the Irish Examiner, which misquoted a reference from the book.   The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a correction.

Mr Stephen Conway complained about an article published in the Wexford Echo relating to the sudden death of his mother which contained a headline that read “FOUL PLAY RULED OUT”,  which he said was deeply distressing for the grieving family.  The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published an apology stating that they understood that foul play was not suspected in the death of the complainant’s mother.

The Department of Finance complained about an article published in the Sunday Independent which it said contained significant and misleading inaccuracies regarding the role of the European Central Bank  in the release of information to journalists about the liquidation of the former Anglo Irish Bank under the  Freedom of Information Act.  The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a clarification stating that the ECB did  not and could not interfere with the release of information under the Freedom of Information Act, and that all decisions about such releases are a matter entirely for the Department of Finance.


A man complained about the publication of a picture of him in the Irish Independent while he pushed his car during heavy flooding.  The complaint was resolved when the newspaper, while maintaining that it had not breached the Code,  apologised to the complainant if the picture caused personal distress to him.  It also undertook to remove the image from its archives and not to use it again.
 

Ms Deirdre Lowney complained about an article in the Irish Independent about the death of her father as a result of a road traffic accident, which reported that the woman’s father and his partner had three children, when in fact the partner was not the children’s mother.  The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a correction.

Ms Carol Hanney complained about a number of articles published in the Irish Daily Mail which reported on her proposed assignment within the Department of Education and Skills, which included a reference to her husband, the Tánaiste, Mr Eamon Gilmore.  She complained that the articles were unfair and inaccurate and were designed to convey the impression that she had been given special treatment because of her husband’s political office.  The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a comprehensive clarification and apology.

The mother of a young man who died tragically complained about a statement in an article in the Irish Examiner about the death of another young person by suicide which stated that Gardai were examining a link between the two deaths.    She complained that there was no evidence that her son died by suicide.  The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a correction and apology to the family, deleted the online article from its archive and requested Google to remove a headline link about which she had also complained.

A complaint from Mr Tom Cooper about a statement in an article published in the Sunday Independent which said that he was “a founder of the Irish National Congress” was resolved when the newspaper published a clarification.      

A complaint about an article in The Irish Times which stated that Tel Aviv was the capital of Israel was resolved when the newspaper published a clarification.     

The legal adviser to the Houses of the Oireachtas complained about an article in the Irish Mail on Sunday headlined ‘Secret deal gives TDs €3m a year raise’, which also referred to Oireachtas envelopes ‘stolen’ by politicians.   The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a correction. 

A man complained about an article in the Irish Examiner which purported to show that 93% of the public decried the closure of the Irish embassy in the Vatican,   but the underlying data for the analysis was drawn from Freedom of Information requests to the Department of Foreign Affairs which revealed that 102 emails were received by the Department of which 93% were critical of the decision.    The matter was resolved when the newspaper published a clarification in its print and online editions and sent the complainant a copy to post to his personal blog.

A complaint was received about an article in the Irish Independent which the complainant said contained an inaccurate statement from a Government Minister of State.    The matter was resolved when the newspaper published a letter from the Minister of State.  

The Principal of Scoil Mhuire Gan Smál in Blarney, Co Cork, complained when the 2012 school league tables were published in The Irish Times and mistakenly reported that no students from his school went to University College Cork in 2012.  The matter was resolved when the newspaper published a correction.

A family who had requested privacy following the murder of a family member complained that a newspaper was continuing to make contact with a family member, despite their request for privacy.    The matter was resolved when the newspaper apologised for the further intrusion and gave an undertaking to circulate his views to all relevant executives.

A mother complained when an article in the Leitrim Observer reported that her son, who had died suddenly, died at home, when this was not the case.   The matter was resolved when the newspaper published a clarification.

Solicitors for Ronan Keating complained about  an article published in the Irish Mail on Sunday, which they said was inaccurate.    The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a correction and apology.

Solicitors for a Mr Dunne complained  about the contents of an article in the Evening Herald in relation to a court case in which Mr Dunne was involved following charges against him for assaulting his ex-girlfriend, which were dismissed.  The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a clarification stating that Mr Dunne had been fully acquitted of the charges against him.

Solicitors for the former Taoiseach, Mr Brian Cowen, complained about an article published in the Irish Mail on Sunday about Mr Cowen’s attendance  at a course in Stanford University, USA.   The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a clarification  and  apology.

A mother complained about an article in the Laois Nationalist about the sudden death of her teenage son because the article reported that her son’s death  was being examined in connection with another local suicide, which she said was untrue.   The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a clarification .

A woman who was the victim of serious offences that featured in a highly publicised court case over 15  years ago contacted the office to complain about  the publication of an article in a local newspaper about another court case involving the man convicted of her assault.   She complained that the republication of material from the earlier case in this article  was extremely distressing for her and her young child.  The complaint was resolved when the newspaper sent her a private letter of apology.

Senator Ronan Mullen complained about the accuracy of an article published in The Irish Times, and the publication of a subsequent letter to the editor from him, about a meeting that took place in Dáil Éireann between Oireachtas members and lobbyists seeking the legalisation of abortion in certain circumstances. The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published an apology on 12 November 2012 stating that the article was not complete and was unfair to Senator Mullen, and it acknowledged that an addendum comment placed beneath his letter to the editor did not clarify his position.
A local authority complained about an article in The Irish Times which it said contained a factually incorrect statement. The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a clarification.
A man complained about the accuracy of a headline to an article in the Irish Mail on Sunday which stated that a leaflet sent to Irish households during the referendum campaign on the fiscal compact was produced and distributed by ‘UKIP’ when it was produced and distributed by the complainant’s party, ‘Europe of Freedom and Democracy Group’ (EFD). The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a correction.
The Teaching Council complained about the publication of a decision of the Press Ombudsman by the Irish Independent, which it said did not comply with the requirements of the Code of Practice for Newspapers and Magazines. The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a follow-up article from the complainants.
A man complained through his solicitors that the Irish Sun incorrectly attributed to him descriptions of an unexplained noise in the Beaufort area of County Kerry. The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a correction and apology stating that the descriptions attributed to the man were incorrect.
A domiciliary midwife complained about the accuracy of an article in The Irish Times about a court case in which she was involved regarding an inquiry into allegations of professional misconduct by her. The newspaper published a correction of its error.
Solicitors acting for an international company made a complaint about an article which contained a statement about the company which they said was inaccurate. The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a correction.
A man complained about the publication of his photograph which accompanied an article that was written about him. The complaint was resolved when the newspaper arranged to have the complainant’s photograph removed from its online site.
A local authority complained about an article in The Irish Times which it said contained a factually incorrect statement. The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a clarification.
A man complained about an article in the Irish Independent which contained several statements that he said were untrue or highly misleading. The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a letter from the complainant outlining his side of the situation.
A man complained about an article published in The Irish Catholic which stated that he was strongly opposed to Ireland’s blasphemy law, which he said was inaccurate. The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a letter from the complainant setting out his views on the matter.
A complaint about an article published in the Evening Herald about the death of a young man in tragic circumstances, which associated the criminal past of another man of the same name to the dead man, was resolved when the newspaper accepted that the article contained a number of factual inaccuracies and published a clarification which included an apology to the family for any distress caused by the errors.
A complaint about the effects of a report about a court case that stated that the defendant had been acting violently towards Gardai, published in The Kerryman, was resolved when the editor of the newspaper wrote a private letter to the complainant acknowledging the distress that the report had inadvertently caused.
A complaint about an article published in The Sunday Times about a beneficial owner of a share in a property trust and her husband was resolved when the newspaper published a right of reply from her.
A complaint about the accuracy of an article in the online edition of the New Ross Standard concerning plans for an all-island memorial to honour the victims of the Great Famine was resolved when the newspaper deleted the article from its website.
Reverend Guy Chave-Cox and his wife, Mrs Heather Chave-Cox, complained about an article published in The Irish Times in August 2010 concerning property at Rosses Point, County Sligo, belonging to the Middleton Estate. Mrs Heather Chave-Cox is a shareholder in the Middleton Estate. The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published the following clarification:


“In an article in the edition of August 23rd last, concerning property at Rosses Point, Co Sligo, it was stated that a Church of England vicar, Reverend Chave-Cox and his wife were claiming rights to property there through an interest in the Middleton Estate. Revd Guy Chave-Cox has not laid claim to any land in Rosses Point. In fact, it is Mrs Chave-Cox only who has an interest in the Middleton Estate.

It was also stated that a number of home-owners received solicitors’ letters containing a 28-day notice to quit their property.

Only one such letter was sent and it was not issued due to any non-ppayment of ground rent. Solicitors P O’Connor and Son have confirmed that Mr Joe Carter of Howley Carter & Co. does not represent the recipient of any 28-day notice letter.

The article also stated that Mrs Chave-Cox was at Rosses Point checking what land the Middleton Estate has rights to. Mrs Chave-Cox has pointed out that she took measurements of buildings in need of repair whilst in the locality on holiday with her family.

The article stated correctly that most of the Middleton family left Ireland up to 90 years ago. Mrs Chave-Cox has pointed out that the majority holding of the estate was in Irish hands less than 20 years ago.

Any distress caused by the error is regretted.”

A man complained about material contained in an online section of the Sligo Weekender, which he said was inaccurate. The editor immediately deleted the material from the website.

A couple complained about the publication of their wedding photograph by the Irish Examiner following their civil wedding, when they were given an undertaking by the photographer present on the day that it would not be published.  The complaint was satisfactorily resolved when the editor wrote directly to the couple explaining how the error happened and apologised for it and erased the photographs from its archive.  He also undertook to provide copies of the photographs to the couple as a gesture of goodwill.

A complaint was received on behalf of a convicted paedophile whose address was published in the News of the World. The complaint was resolved when the newspaper advised that it had no plans to publish any further articles about the man in question.
A man complained about an article in the “I Spy” column of the Irish Independent which he believed to be inaccurate and offensive. The complaint was satisfactorily resolved when the newspaper published a clarification and apology for any offence caused by the article.
A man complained about an article in the Irish Sun which published a photograph of him to illustrate an article highly critical of another person with the same name. The complaint was satisfactorily resolved the newspaper published a clarification.
A sporting organization complained that a headline to an article published in the Irish Daily Mail relating to the pricing of its premium level tickets was inaccurate. The complaint was satisfactorily resolved when the newspaper published a clarification.
A family complained about the publication of a piece in the Connaught Telegraph about the circumstances surrounding the recent death of their late son and brother. The complaint was satisfactorily resolved when the editor wrote a personal letter of apology to the family for any distress caused.

A family complained about an article relating to the circumstances surrounding the death of two family members some 30 years previously.   Reference to the deaths was made in the context of an article about the recent imprisonment of the person responsible.    The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a clarification.

A man complained about the accuracy of a report published in the Irish Independent relating to an ongoing dispute between the Government and pharmacists.  The newspaper initially offered to publish a letter from the complainant giving his side of the story, but the complaint was resolved when the newspaper agreed to contact the complainant by telephone to hear his side of the argument.

A businessman complained through his solicitors about three articles published in the Irish Mail on Sunday which he said contained personal and intimate information and (which he said contained) a number of factual inaccuracies which were damaging to his personal and professional reputation.  The complaint was resolved when the newspaper, after being contacted by the Office of the Press Ombudsman, successfully concluded direct negotiations with the complainant’s solicitors.

A man complained about an article published in the Sunday Tribune which he said gave an incorrect account of his role in a dispute involving the company for which he worked. The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a clarification.
A family complained about an article published in the Irish Sunday Mirror about the death of their son in tragic and controversial circumstances, which included a photograph of their dead son. The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a clarification and apologised for any upset caused.
The CEO of a company complained that an article about a housing project initiated by his company portrayed a damaging, unfair and untruthful public perception of his organisation, and that it contained a number of inaccuracies and misleading statements. The complaint was resolved when the editor of the newspaper met with the complainant and subsequently visited a number of the company’s housing projects.
A family complained about two articles published in the Sunday Independent relating to the death of their son in tragic and controversial circumstances. The complaints were resolved when the newspaper published a statement expressing regret for any upset caused to the family.
A man complained about an article which he believed contained an incorrect interpretation of the Koran. The complaint was speedily resolved when the newspaper published a letter from the complainant, setting out his side of the story, in its “Letters to the Editor” page.
A woman complained that a photograph of her husband was published in error by the Irish Daily Star. The photograph was accompanied by an article which stated that he was the father of a named woman whose photograph was also published. The complaint was resolved after the newspaper apologised directly to the complainant for the error.
A man complained that an article published in The Irish Times contained a number of inaccuracies about his company’s business in relation to its share dealings. The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published an apology and a correction.
A man complained that a report in the Irish Examiner contained an inaccuracy in relation to Garda action following a murder in a residential area. The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a correction.
A man complained about an article regarding an EU Commission Report that he considered was unfair and inaccurate . The newspaper offered to give the complainant a right of reply by publishing a letter to the editor. While the complainant did not take up the offer, the complaint was resolved when a letter from him, setting out his views on the article under complaint, was sent to the newspaper’s editor for consideration in the context of any future coverage of the matters in question.

A woman complained about a number of statements, which she said were inaccurate or misleading, contained in an article about foreign adoptions published in the Irish Independent. The complaint was resolved when the newspaper and the complainant agreed to the publication of a letter from her setting out her views on the matter.

A man complained that an article published in The Kerryman which included a reference to him contained a number of inaccuracies. The complaint was resolved satisfactory when the newspaper very swiftly gave an undertaking to publish a further article clarifying the matters under complaint.

A man complained through his solicitors about an item which appeared in the newspaper referring to the circumstances in which his late wife was taken to hospital, which he said caused him and his family deep upset and severe insult.

The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a clarification and an apology for any offence caused to the woman’s relatives and friends.

A company complained that an article published by the newspaper alleged that its website was owned by a former director of the company who no longer had any involvement with the business.

The newspaper had, in response to a direct complaint from the company some weeks prior to its approach to the Office of the Press Ombudsman, immediately deleted the article from its website and marked its cuttings library accordingly. When the complainant searched the internet some weeks later she accessed the article on an external website. On receipt of this further complaint the newspaper immediately undertook to contact the website in question, and the complainant accepted that the newspaper had done everything within its power to have the article deleted from all external websites.

A husband and wife complained about the publication of their names and their children’s names and their full address by the newspaper following an incident in which they were the victims of criminal activity.

The complaint was resolved when the newspaper deleted the article from its website and from Google’s cached pages.

A man complained about calls to his family home by one of the newspaper’s reporters following the death of his daughter in tragic circumstances.

The newspaper explained the background to the newspaper’s efforts to contact the complainant, and indicated that it was never its intention to harass the complainant or his family.

The complaint was resolved when the newspaper immediately confirmed that it would not make any further attempts to contact the complainant or his family.

A man complained about a particular reference to him in an article which he said was derogatory and embarrassing. While the newspaper offered to publish a letter from the complainant, this offer was not accepted by him.

The newspaper published an item which accepted that the language used was offensive and unwarranted. The man complained about the size and positioning of the item on the page, and the complaint was resolved when the paper re-published the item more prominently the following week after representations were made to this effect.

A man complained about a front page article headlined “Orange marches spark attacks on police officers” published in the Sunday Times on 13 July which, he believed, gave a misleading and inaccurate impression of what occurred on the day in question.

The complaint was resolved when the newspaper wrote to the complainant accepting that part of the article may have been misleading, and by subsequently publishing an agreed correction.

A man complained through his solicitors that an article published by the Irish Daily Mail made an inaccurate report of the death of his late wife.

The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published a clarification which was acceptable to the complainant.

A man complained about three articles published by the Sunday Tribune between 2001 and 2003, which he felt affected his good name and which remained available on the newspaper’s website.

The complaint was resolved when the newspaper very speedily agreed to remove the offending articles from its website.

A man complained about a crime statistic used in an article published in the Sunday Independent.

The complaint was resolved when the newspaper clarified to the complainant, and the complainant accepted, the situation in relation to the statistic used in the report.

A family member complained, on her own behalf and on behalf of her family, about an article published by the Irish Star Sunday in relation to the circumstances surrounding her late father’s death. The woman and her family were particularly upset at the newspaper’s decision to publish photographs of her late father’s body.

The complaint was resolved following a meeting between the editor of the newspaper and the complainant, as a result of which the newspaper published an agreed apology.

A woman complained about the Evening Herald’s coverage of a court case which stated inaccurately that her husband had been left without conviction “after paying her compensation”. The woman complained that it was totally inaccurate to state that her husband had paid her compensation.

The complaint was resolved when the newspaper published an agreed clarification.

A man complained about an article published by the Western People in 2004, which he felt affected his good name, which referred to him directly, and which remained available on the newspaper’s website.

The complaint was resolved when the newspaper agreed to remove the offending article from its website.